Games As a Service

Man, Street Fighter V is certainly great. It’s got ranked matches and player matches and…replays and…some short story bits and…um…not a whole lot else. I mean, comparatively speaking, this isn’t much different than Super Street Fighter II on SNES, but that also released in 1994.

A lot of developers like to look at their games as “services”. When DLC is factored into the development cycle, one is constantly thinking about what is coming next. Does the base game end at going gold, or do you continue to release things steadily throughout the year?

Most of us gamers grew up in an era where ceasing development was the end point of any changes to the game. There are always going to be last minute changes, but for the most part, calling a project finished meant just that.

More recently, however, games have continued to grow and expand. Killer Instinct launched on Xbox One as a free-to-play game with multiple seasons. Hell, that game is prepping for a third season and PC release; it is far from being finished.

Not finished? The hell, you say?

For that matter, Sony has molded Driveclub into a pretty respectable racing sim. That game launched with a laundry list of issues, but those barely remain. The constant stream of extra campaigns and new courses has also kept the game from becoming stale.

If you look at the history of Street Fighter, you almost see the same thing. Capcom had listened to fan feedback and kept tweaking the foundation that Street Fighter II was built on. When the game’s initial run was complete, we ended up having six official versions of it; if you want to count the HD Remix, that makes seven.

For that matter, both Street Fighter Alpha and Street Fighter III saw three different versions (and Alpha had some console ports with different things). Capcom has never been one to release a fighter and call it a day. Their previous efforts without the internet lead them to creating multiple SKUs.

Street Fighter V is just the natural progression of their developmental mindset. They are no longer shackled to brick and mortar releases or physical distribution. The internet has changed the way which they can tweak their titles.

That doesn’t excuse the lack of features in the current version. For $60, it is insane to expect people to be okay with waiting for content that is available in other games. A story mode is coming, but what is included just seems insultingly bare.

And this is insultingly not bare (in the final game).

For that matter, why are most of the online features not present? You would think with all of the work done onStreet Fighter IV that Capcom would have some grasp of what their community wants. Basic multiplayer lobbies and better replay features should be present.

This is all putting aside the fact that Capcom rushed the game out for tournament players. The deadlines for making EVO qualification were at the end of February, so Capcom needed this released to allow hardcore players to get in the competition.

That doesn’t do much for the more casual gamer. I’m of the mind that a company as big as Capcom could have spent more resources to finish all of the features for launch. There is no compelling reason that anything should be absent, apart from planned DLC.

If EVO were such a big concern, why not release a cheaper, digital only release with an upgrade option? We do live in the age of the internet, which is something Capcom is clearly banking on. My main concern becomes when any kind of server support for Street Fighter V is ceased; people will have a game on disc that is basically nothing.

Then again, we are in the year 2016 and there are still Street Fighter II tournaments being held. Capcom has created a legacy with this series that will not burn out. Even if the genre of games saw a hiatus between Street Fighter III and Street Fighter IV, the rise of social media and blogging has given niches a voice.

I know, Ryu; it is really stupid.

Those voices wanted a return to the glory days of 16-bit fighters. Since 2009, I can’t even recall the amount of fighting games that have appeared. BlazBlue, Mortal Kombat, Persona 4: Arena, Guilty Gear Xrd; I could be here for a while mentioning them all. There was always an audience for this genre, but developers just assumed no one wanted to play them.

As it stands, though, Street Fighter V is a bit disappointing. The game may be solid and have legs, but the amount of content present is unjustifiable. Anyone whom drops $60 on that and is happy is either blinded with nostalgia or just plain easy-going.

Hopefully Capcom doesn’t go back on their word. They stated that Street Fighter IV would be a service, yet we’ve seen four different retail releases of the game. For what is planned, I have hopes for Street Fighter V. I like that playing the game will earn me new characters, which just plain makes sense.

It’s almost like an old-school game; almost.


Something About Sex: Get Out

Sex is one of the most powerful industries in the modern world. Sex conquers nearly every piece of media that it enters. There are entire books dedicated to the subject. Most of the 70’s Classic Rock output consisted of songs written to purely evoke a sexual tension. A sub-genre of film was created to simply showcase the act.

But what does that mean for videogames? Simply that in the future, we will more than likely see games that are only sex … actually, that’s already happened. The better question is how do I feel about sex in my videogames?

To lay the ground work for my real-life counterpart, sex is something that frightens me. I was born and raised a Catholic boy, a title that I am now pretty ashamed of. My parents always told me, “You keep it in your pants!” and, “Think with your brain at all times!”

To further complicate the matter, girls have never truly liked me. I became infatuated with the idea of a woman in middle school, but I never confronted her with my lust. When I got to high school, depression set in and I was often simply thinking of ending my life.

Eventually I met a very colorful character and fell for her. She spoke of all the ridiculous acts she had done and I became very intrigued as to how people can simply fornicate and not have the act take any kind of impact on their character. She teased me with ideas of us being together and it simply led to me loosing a very good friend and blaming it on sex.

To me, sex is something that just ruins my life. I can sit at home at night and browse various Web sites for some kind of fetish, but it just makes me feel sick. Why and how do people commit these acts so freely (granted I am basing this off of the sick view of the Internet)?

On to the real answer: what do I feel about it in my games? I think it really has no place in the interactive medium (and Heavy Rain proves me right). Videogames often do not have sex as a means of dissecting what it can do to the human psyche. They are simply trying to sell an image that the largest demographic (Males 18-34) will eat up.

I have not seen one instance of sexual tension in a videogame that truly warranted it. When strong female characters are created in games, they often lack over-sexualized features. I find the strangest females attractive because their personalities are what intrigue me, not their “assets.”

When strong male characters are created, we almost have an inverse of the female philosophy. They are given rugged good looks or sophisticated voices and are knights of the greatest valor. The women are often shown as sexual icons in the light of evil. Their desires are meant to evoke some kind of negative feeling out of you, or a purely sexual tension that is talked down upon.

The males are shown as either having no sexual desire whatsoever or as disgusting pigs who only want sex. No middle ground exists to say, “I enjoy being with you and want to express my love.” We simply have, “NIKO, MY COUSIN. BIG AMERICAN TEETEES!”

Mass Effect
tries to prove me wrong on this matter. Shepard is not a sexual deviant, but in the same instance he can be. The paths you choose in that game can lead Shepard to cause great discomfort to the other females he courts (or males if your choice is female Shepard).

Mostly any BioWare game has some kind of romance that leads to sex. My question is, “What does this really result in?” Is there a true purpose for the sexual act or is the game just trying to create a world that feels immersive?

Fighting games are at least the most blatant about their sexual references. Games like Dead or Alive know that sex is the main reason most people will play, but they don’t only flaunt the sex. You have a very satisfying fighting game built first and then character designed to be visual eye candy. It may not be very courteous to women, but at least you know that the sole intention is sex.

Street Fighter even has women with barely any clothing — Just look at Cammy or Elena. There is no sensible way you can tell me that wearing no pants makes you a better soldier or that the reason you are wearing what is conceivably a swimsuit is because you live in an impoverished country. You were just designed to be sexualized.

I haven’t experienced a game that gives me the option of sex that actually makes good use of it. It just seems to exist as a purely voyeuristic way for gamers to get their rocks off. I’m not sure if it’s the industry pegging us as worthless nerds or not, but it certainly has no belonging in the medium.

Until our industry matures to the point where story lines and characters can be taken seriously, I will never accept sex in my games. It doesn’t enhance my experience and it certainly does not add to any kind of gameplay department.

My Summer – Bonus Day: SGC Memories and Blog Reflections

Summer is finally over, g1’s. A new school year has started and so my gaming blogs will be more weekly instead of intense, daily excursions of gaming glory. I’m going to take the time in this blog to discuss the other aspects of my summer and give some reflections on how I felt about my day-to-day overviews of games.

If you are a newer g1 (or somehow spent time under a rock for the past year), then you may not know that Screwattack held a convention this summer titled, “SGC.” As luck may have it, I was able to attend this glorious convention.

I have to say, having only been to one previous gaming convention before (Digital Overload, if you need to know), SGC blew my mind. I was not sure what to expect (I was thinking panels would be 4-5 hours apart with really just people talking for the rest of the time), I could not believe the awesome I had encountered.

All of this almost didn’t happen, though. When I arrived at the luxurious (i.e. crappy) Westin Hotel, I was met with a strange problem. INSUFFICIENT FUNDS! “SHIT,” I began to think, “WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED?” As it turns out, do not book your hotel room online and expect the hotel staff to receive payment without specifically asking them to.

After a few calls to my mother (who pretty much panicked), I was able to procure a room for 3 nights until she could pay the rest (which she was able to get and I am grateful for). Well, with this harrowing moment put behind me, I walked over to receive my staff badge for the weekend. While waiting, I happened to run into a few nice guys who I spent the evening with. We went over to Denny’s and have a great time.

Now, Denny’s has never agreed with me. I knew that going in, but I didn’t want to be a killjoy and say, “Screw that place and f*#@ you guys,” as I was really having fun with them. So the next morning, about 45 minutes before the convention started, my stomach hit the floor. What else could go wrong this weekend?

Thankfully, nothing did. Even though I reduced my food intake to a granola bar every 10 hours (and eventually I had a burger for lunch on Sunday), I was filled with enough energy to act crazy around people and have a great time kicking ass on Street Fighter 3.

My weekend was pretty much the Street Fighter 3 cabinet. I ended up playing at least 40 matches with one kid who was pretty proficient with Dudley. Being an old fan of SF3, but not playing in years, I had to stick with my man Ryu. We had some great matchups and even ended up getting a perfect on each other in one match.

As for meet ups with the crew, I pretty much talked to everyone but Bryan, Corey and Ben. I did help Corey on the first day by moving some stuff with 2 other fellows, but I never tried to bother her during the weekend (she was incredibly busy). Time for the requisite SGC photos with people, courtesy of my extremely awful camera.


Nick never dropped character as Tommy, but I still felt I needed to get something out of him. As I approached him for the picture, I asked him, “Can I punch you in the beak?” Tommy shook his head and simply said, “I’d have to punch you in the beak, then.” Fair trade in my mind, but he took our picture and went on about our business.


Brentalfloss was a great guy. He walked into the Console Gaming area and GPX felt like doing an interview with him. To my fortune, I happened to be the patsy behind the counter that was called to hold the camera. Before the interview, I got my picture and we chatted a little. I lamented not seeing his live performance, but he assured me that the good times were still coming.


Craig was a great man to meet. I’ve looked up to him in the past few months for this ability to take nothing and create greatness. I looked up so much that for a school assignment in one of my journalism classes, I interviewed the man. I was sure he would forget, but he told me that he had the interview framed in his office. You wouldn’t imagine the pride I felt hearing that.


Now the picture with Jose is probably my favorite. The day before, I had said a simple hello to Jose and began laughing my ass off. I straightened myself out and said it again. Jose simply started at me and said, “F$*# you.” We then shared a laugh and parted ways. I met up with him the next day and he simply had me get on the floor because of his lack of energy. Right before the photo, he told me, “Dude, your hand is right near my balls.” Classic Jose quote, right there.



As for Chad and Destin, not many things were said. This was the last day and the final few minutes before everyone was leaving, so I had to make it quick. Chad and I talked a bit, but mostly about how great the weekend was. Destin simply got my picture and I shook his hand, but I kind of shook it twice and felt awkward. I hope Destin doesn’t think I’m some weirdo after that.

If you are wondering what I did as staff, I was helping in the console gaming room. I dolled out the games and controllers to people while making sure no one stole anything (we did almost misplace a few copies of Gears, though). The guys running the console room, GPX Gaming, were extremely nice and I’m thankfully that they were able to help me with questions (also, props to The God Damned Batman for being hilarious).

Regarding my week-long blogs about games, I feel pretty good. I started to lose some steam when I wrote about Blazblue (I drifted towards review more than opinion and impression) and I wasn’t too happy with infamous, but I think I did well overall.

The reaction to my blogs was pretty impressive at first, but it slowly died down as the week went on. While I wasn’t discouraged by this, I’m wondering exactly what I should do to generate a bigger reaction for my future blogs and series. If there is anything at all you g1’s would like to see, please let me know.

And now time for the serious part of the blog. Last week on Saturday, my grandmother passed away after 91 years of life. She was a big influence in the way I wanted to pursue religion in my life and she helped me define my character when I meet people. She will be missed dearly.

In the end, my summer was good, but much like life everything eventually comes to an end. Here’s hoping that we all learn from our experiences and that we never let small things in life bog us down. I will do my best in the future to improve my skills and hopefully bring joy to you g1’s.