Re-Release: Definitive Edition

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This isn’t a blog about the influx of re-releases we’ve been seeing this generation. This isn’t even a blog about how I dislike GOTY/Definitive releases of games that I spent too much money on. No, I’m more concerned with the titles that publishers see fit to attach to their games.

In what world is Tomb Raider on PS4 or Xbox One the “definitive” release of the game? Does it have support for 4k resolutions? Can I use my mind to control everything? Does it include everything the sequel did better?

This kind of problem is something I noticed at the beginning of the current gaming generation. Nintendo stated that the philosophy for the Wii U was centered around the individual. That is what gave the moniker of “U” to the console, as in “you”.

At the same time, Microsoft dubbed their next console the Xbox One. Since it was going to be the sole box underneath your television (or at least the main attraction), they named the console after being a one stop destination for entertainment.

While that’s all fine and dandy, what does it tell consumers? When you use ridiculous superlatives or descriptors for your products, it confuses people. Xbox One sounds like someone referring to the OG Xbox. “Definitive” Edition implies that there will not be another release of the game or that it cannot become better.

As I stated above, you can do better. You can always do better. It’s the reason why a film like Blade Runner has 5 different versions; Ridley Scott wasn’t satisfied with the end result until nearly 30 years later (granted the studio kind of fucked his movie, initially).

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Stop fucking with my movie!

As stupid as it may be to re-release a game with little to no extras, at least Nintendo hasn’t tried to disguise the fact. Both of their HD Zelda ports have simply been named “HD Edition”. That isn’t even entirely true, as facets of the game have been tweaked for better playability.

Still, one can know exactly what they are getting with that. If you don’t care to have an HD version of a game you enjoy, then you don’t need to get it. You won’t feel cheated out of missing something or sad that you spent money on downloadable content that is now included with the base game.

Sleeping Dogs happens to be the worst of them. Not only is the original PC version better looking, but the original console releases were pretty bad. They certainly ran decently enough, but they looked awful. Textures were flat, load times were horrendous and the game felt too slow.

Now there is a “Definitive Edition” for PS4 and Xbox One and it feels much closer to the PC original. This just sucks for console gamers who spent $60 for the base (unacceptable) game and $30 for the (completely useless) season pass. Why not just delay the game for another year to launch on next-gen consoles?

Capcom seems to be going with a more archival approach, but how many times can someone willfully buy Resident Evil 4? Not only did you just come out with an HD version of it, but there is literally nothing you can add over the final PC release.

For that matter, next-gen consoles cannot output at 4k resolution, so when are we going to get 4k remasters of these games? Are those going to be “Ultra HD Remasters”? Will there be any sense in selling the same product across multiple generations?

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Leon looks so much better!………………..

Not to come off as a PC Elitist, but that format never had a problem with re-releases or “enhanced” versions. Games on PC were essentially required to support multiple resolutions and eventually came with HD support out of the box.

1600×1200 might not sound like an HD resolution, but it actually has more pixels than 720p (and, vertically, 1080p). The picture format may be relegated to 4:3 (or a square), but it produces a crisp, clear picture that consoles still struggle with rendering.

Consoles will always be locked to the hardware they were created with. That may allow a developer to push their technology to the max, but it clearly doesn’t produce an end result that is “definitive”. A newer console will be able to run that same game with better clarity.

On PC, you never have to rebuy an older game just to experience it with smoother gameplay (there are some exceptions). Just upgrading your hardware a little tends to increase fluidity in controller response. It goes a long way to making less graphically demanding games feel beautiful.

Yet consoles are stuck with their fixed hardware and games that end up falling short of the mark. Then the next generation begins and we’re saddled with an “Ultimate Edition” or “Remaster”, etc. It’s pointless; just stop calling your games that.

Mojang has it best with Minecraft. This is the PS4 Edition. This is the Xbox 360 Edition. You aren’t getting more or less stuff (disregarding the console exclusive packs), you’re just getting it for your platform of choice. It’s title is clear, concise and free of bullshit lies.

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No shit here.

So developers, just stop lying to us. I don’t care if you’re compiling all your DLC into a new package. I don’t give a shit if this is a “better” version of a previously released game. Just stop claiming it’s “definitive”; we all know that is horse shit.

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Series I Love – The Legend of Zelda

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When I was younger, picking which games I wanted to play was simple. I was a pretty damn spoiled kid, so I usually saw something in the store and my mother bought it. While she objected to some things, she typically got me anything my heart desired.

Walking into our local Toys’R’Us one evening in 1998, I happened upon a flyer for an upcoming game called Zelda. My reading comprehension wasn’t as astute as now, so I didn’t even catch the subtitle underneath. To me, the golden sheen and shield crest were enough to hook my interest.

Over the next few months, I played my N64 as usual and kept my obsession with Goldeneye 007 going. At such a tender age, nearly any game would get its hooks into me and engulf my imagination. I kept thinking back to that sword and shield and wondering what dangers awaited me.

As the release date drew closer, Nintendo began their marketing campaign on TV and in movie theaters. I distinctly remember sitting in the theaters and seeing the “WHILST THOU SUCK?” advertisement. It put a fire in my eyes and made me determined to prove those ads wrong.

A night or two before the games release, I heard from a GameStop employee that the cartridge for Ocarina of Time was going to be gold. My little mind was blown. I couldn’t let this thing escape me. I needed to have this game in my collection. It felt like a rite of passage.

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After getting home with the game, I couldn’t wait to play it. I nearly ripped the box apart with excitement, but I saved my enthusiasm for the journey. I didn’t want to sully the experience by destroying its case.

As soon as the first chords of the theme played, I was in love. The game felt legendary even without its namesake. For 10 year old me, this was the most important game of my life. It was almost as if I became an adult as I stepped in Link’s boots and set off to save the land of Hyrule.

I had never played anything like it at that point in my life. My childhood was full of video games, but the 90’s were dominated by platformers and beat-em-ups. Fighting games were a big deal after Street Fighter, but not many besides that and Mortal Kombat stuck around.

Something like Zelda encompassed all of the exploration I loved from Mario with puzzle solving and dungeon diving. It was literally being placed into darkness with some tools and being told to figure it out. You had no guide and your worth was measured in accomplishing the mind benders in front of you.

I don’t remember how long it took my younger self to finish the N64 classic; I do know that I nearly missed the bus ride to school one morning since I was nearing the end and refused to skip the cutscene. My mother also nearly fell asleep listening to Zelda’s lullaby after a long night at work.

That same year, Nintendo had a double whammy for young me. A colorized version of the first portable Zelda title, Link’s Awakening, was released for the Gameboy Color. I always brought the device with me to school for recess and the bus rides, so clearly I had to have this other Zelda title.

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When I’d leave home for the bus stop, I’d pack Link’s Awakening with me. From one to the other, my adventures with Link never ended. I’d sketch doodles of Link tackling foes, exploring ruins and finding treasure. I would fantasize about being in those dank caverns and surmounting the colossal beasts.

Since those games, The Legend of Zelda has become my favorite series. I’ve beaten each game in the series more than once (save for a couple of them) and I even get excited hearing about re-releases of past games. It’s strange to be excited for an HD version of a game you’ve finished 3 times and still own.

Even the dreaded Zelda 2 I’ve managed to complete twice. When playing it, I find the game amazing. For that matter, during any of the Zelda games, I’m awestruck. How Nintendo manages to craft such a varied world with intricate puzzles and hidden treasures is just awesome to me.

The mixture of thought provoking puzzle design and grandiose combat scenarios with a classic tale of good versus evil just keeps me coming back. I dig all of the variations the series has seen. Wind Waker is my favorite and I love bringing a friend along in Four Swords Adventures. The more recent Triforce Heroes is a solid co-op puzzle game and Skyward Sword made me a believer of motion controls.

Honestly, there isn’t a title in the series I truly dislike. I may complain about the issues that Twilight Princess has wit pacing or how superfluous most of Skyward Sword is, but I can’t get enough of those worlds. They are filled to the brim with interesting content.

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More importantly, they make me feel like my actions matter. I know that gaming has always placed your character as a hero, but those exploits weren’t as personal until The Legend of Zelda came along. With Zelda 2, Link was now directly helping people with their requests.

Running menial tasks shouldn’t be that gratifying, but I’ve always been drawn to the side quests in Zelda. Fishing for hours to get a stupid scale or holding onto a chicken and floating down to Earth is utterly captivating to me. That each activity rewards the player with something useful also makes those tasks feel less tedious.

I also just plain love exploring. Hyrule has had such a rich landscape, but even the extra worlds of Termina and Koholint are filled with nooks and crannies to delve into. As much as I may associate puzzles with Zelda, spelunking is a big part of the formula.

I’m not opposed to change and I do wish that some of the tropes would be put to rest, but I’m always eager and ready for a new Zelda title. Each one is like stepping into an actual legend. That I get to be the hero who overcomes adverse odds is just icing on the cake.

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Here’s to the future of Zelda.

Living in inFamy

When battling my depression, there was always a lingering thought on my mind; people must think I’m a freak. I felt like a pariah in most situations and always believed people were looking at me wrong. I was the enemy.

It seems that if you express a different view from the norm or like off-kilter things, you become labeled an outcast. You’re then destined to be rejected and abhorred simply for existing. Even if your actions are from a pure heart, no one will care.

The “inFamous” series always tried to tackle ideas like this. Cole McGrath was cast aside even after saving a handful of citizens. Everyone saw his electrical powers and feared the worst. Sadly, it was hard to become invested in his character as Cole was pretty much a blank slate.

His voice acting was drab and monotonous and his “moral” choices were so binary as to become a practical joke. Nothing felt like a tough decision as the “evil” side of the game was merely a worst case scenario made real. Even the developers consider the “evil” side non-canon, so why take it seriously?

Much to my surprise, “inFamous: Second Son” corrects the biggest problem of it’s predecessors; Delsin Rowe is a very likeable guy. His goal is more noble and his attitude changes over the course of the game. You don’t start off hating everyone and end up acting like a savior.

Delsin just wants the best for his family, a small, fictional, Native-American tribe by the name of “Akomish.” He also seeks to freely express himself. He is tired of the dictation that his brother and society place upon him.

In the seething depths of depression, this is exactly how your mind feels. You begin seeing regular citizens as the “enemy” and wish to become free. A life without restraint and with the power to impact immediate change becomes your dream.

While Delsin may not follow all legal precautions, he never once foams at the mouth for bloodshed. Even when playing the game through as “evil,” the narrative hardly deviates from Delsin being a nice person. This happens to be the worst part of the game, however.

Without any real transformation coming from your actions, why even place those alternate paths in the game? The excellent prequel game, “inFamous: First Light,” dropped morality entirely and presented a gripping backstory that made you feel like you inhabited protagonist Fetch’s body.

Since I played that first, I figured that maybe Sucker Punch had decided to get rid of the antiquated idea of moral choices. Instead, gamers are presented with two different paths that feel like real choices, but with very little motivation to select the “evil” side.

Even the game’s power-ups tend to favor “good” over “evil.” While playing with good karma, players can opt in to an upgrade that allows them to restore health upon subduing an enemy versus killing them. This action is insanely simple with a few choice powers (Neon and slow-mo; DONE DEAL).

When you’re “evil”, nothing like that exists. You can’t even slow down time like with good karma Neon powers. Not only are you handicapped on evil, but the game becomes more difficult to deal with.

Maybe that design was deliberate. Even the ending of the game is unsatisfactory on the “evil” side. I suppose to deter people from straying down the road less taken, Sucker Punch decided to nerf “evil” until it was unfavorable.

Say you wanted to go about that path anyway. Why does the story not reflect what you’re doing? You get small phone calls that will say things like, “Delsin, how could you?” Then in the cutscene after, your brother claims he is proud of you. I suppose murdering 20 people for fun is something to cherish.

So I’m a bit torn on “inFamous: Second Son.” While playing through as a hero, the game is very much a step-up from it’s predecessors. It has better thought out powers, a wonderful protagonist and some excellent mission structure.

When going through doing evil, the game just falls apart. The narrative reeks of lazy writing and the choices feel shoe-horned in purely for the sake of tradition. This is almost like checking off a box at the marketing department.

All this and the prequel upstages the main course. Obviously Sucker Punch listened to fan feedback on Second Son, because First Light is really special. It’s shorter, tighter, more action packed and features a much more detailed personality for Fetch. It also has a smart list of bonus trials to accomplish along with a horde mode.

She can horde my heart all night long…Wait a minute.

I just wish that Sucker Punch could 100% nail an inFamous game. After giving up on the series with 2 and being pleasantly surprised with First Light, I feel that the formula can work. Either dropping the morality or vastly changing the game for each side would be a great place to start.