Series I Love – The Legend of Zelda

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When I was younger, picking which games I wanted to play was simple. I was a pretty damn spoiled kid, so I usually saw something in the store and my mother bought it. While she objected to some things, she typically got me anything my heart desired.

Walking into our local Toys’R’Us one evening in 1998, I happened upon a flyer for an upcoming game called Zelda. My reading comprehension wasn’t as astute as now, so I didn’t even catch the subtitle underneath. To me, the golden sheen and shield crest were enough to hook my interest.

Over the next few months, I played my N64 as usual and kept my obsession with Goldeneye 007 going. At such a tender age, nearly any game would get its hooks into me and engulf my imagination. I kept thinking back to that sword and shield and wondering what dangers awaited me.

As the release date drew closer, Nintendo began their marketing campaign on TV and in movie theaters. I distinctly remember sitting in the theaters and seeing the “WHILST THOU SUCK?” advertisement. It put a fire in my eyes and made me determined to prove those ads wrong.

A night or two before the games release, I heard from a GameStop employee that the cartridge for Ocarina of Time was going to be gold. My little mind was blown. I couldn’t let this thing escape me. I needed to have this game in my collection. It felt like a rite of passage.

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After getting home with the game, I couldn’t wait to play it. I nearly ripped the box apart with excitement, but I saved my enthusiasm for the journey. I didn’t want to sully the experience by destroying its case.

As soon as the first chords of the theme played, I was in love. The game felt legendary even without its namesake. For 10 year old me, this was the most important game of my life. It was almost as if I became an adult as I stepped in Link’s boots and set off to save the land of Hyrule.

I had never played anything like it at that point in my life. My childhood was full of video games, but the 90’s were dominated by platformers and beat-em-ups. Fighting games were a big deal after Street Fighter, but not many besides that and Mortal Kombat stuck around.

Something like Zelda encompassed all of the exploration I loved from Mario with puzzle solving and dungeon diving. It was literally being placed into darkness with some tools and being told to figure it out. You had no guide and your worth was measured in accomplishing the mind benders in front of you.

I don’t remember how long it took my younger self to finish the N64 classic; I do know that I nearly missed the bus ride to school one morning since I was nearing the end and refused to skip the cutscene. My mother also nearly fell asleep listening to Zelda’s lullaby after a long night at work.

That same year, Nintendo had a double whammy for young me. A colorized version of the first portable Zelda title, Link’s Awakening, was released for the Gameboy Color. I always brought the device with me to school for recess and the bus rides, so clearly I had to have this other Zelda title.

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When I’d leave home for the bus stop, I’d pack Link’s Awakening with me. From one to the other, my adventures with Link never ended. I’d sketch doodles of Link tackling foes, exploring ruins and finding treasure. I would fantasize about being in those dank caverns and surmounting the colossal beasts.

Since those games, The Legend of Zelda has become my favorite series. I’ve beaten each game in the series more than once (save for a couple of them) and I even get excited hearing about re-releases of past games. It’s strange to be excited for an HD version of a game you’ve finished 3 times and still own.

Even the dreaded Zelda 2 I’ve managed to complete twice. When playing it, I find the game amazing. For that matter, during any of the Zelda games, I’m awestruck. How Nintendo manages to craft such a varied world with intricate puzzles and hidden treasures is just awesome to me.

The mixture of thought provoking puzzle design and grandiose combat scenarios with a classic tale of good versus evil just keeps me coming back. I dig all of the variations the series has seen. Wind Waker is my favorite and I love bringing a friend along in Four Swords Adventures. The more recent Triforce Heroes is a solid co-op puzzle game and Skyward Sword made me a believer of motion controls.

Honestly, there isn’t a title in the series I truly dislike. I may complain about the issues that Twilight Princess has wit pacing or how superfluous most of Skyward Sword is, but I can’t get enough of those worlds. They are filled to the brim with interesting content.

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More importantly, they make me feel like my actions matter. I know that gaming has always placed your character as a hero, but those exploits weren’t as personal until The Legend of Zelda came along. With Zelda 2, Link was now directly helping people with their requests.

Running menial tasks shouldn’t be that gratifying, but I’ve always been drawn to the side quests in Zelda. Fishing for hours to get a stupid scale or holding onto a chicken and floating down to Earth is utterly captivating to me. That each activity rewards the player with something useful also makes those tasks feel less tedious.

I also just plain love exploring. Hyrule has had such a rich landscape, but even the extra worlds of Termina and Koholint are filled with nooks and crannies to delve into. As much as I may associate puzzles with Zelda, spelunking is a big part of the formula.

I’m not opposed to change and I do wish that some of the tropes would be put to rest, but I’m always eager and ready for a new Zelda title. Each one is like stepping into an actual legend. That I get to be the hero who overcomes adverse odds is just icing on the cake.

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Here’s to the future of Zelda.

On Nintendo and “Artificial Scarcity”

When the Nintendo Wii launched in 2006, you were lucky if you got one. The system was one of the fastest selling consoles, at the time, and ended up being the biggest success Nintendo has had with a home console. For years after release, the Wii was barely seen at stores.

Many a parent confronted this situation in 2006.

Flash forward to the present and we’re seeing a similar pattern. Amiibos are scarce and the “New” 3DS is basically a myth to most people. Along with that, Nintendo has produced a scant few copies of their “limited edition” releases that have enraged fans who were unable to be at a computer when they were announced.

While I love Nintendo, I honestly cannot defend these types of situations. The fact that small plastic figures are selling on eBay for close to $100 is just ludicrous. Nintendo is sitting on a literal gold mine (as shown by the sales numbers) and is, essentially, throwing away the chance for extra profit.

This seems to be a trend with the company. Certain items are available for a short time and then vanish. Four Swords for the DSi was given away in a free promotion and then left the DSi Shop (it did resurface for four days, but it happened three years later).

There are even special events that Nintendo runs for PokeMon that end up with impossible to catch creatures being absent from the digital worlds. Unless you were lucky enough to know to visit the Tokyo PokeMon center (or if you were even alive), you basically  missed out on Celebi and Arceus.

Nintendo of America seems to be the worst of the bunch. With both Mario Kart 8 and Hyrule Warriors, the only collector’s editions in the entire United States were at Nintendo World in New York City. While I was able to get the Mario Kart 8 bundle, I missed out completely on Hyrule Warriors.

Stupid Sigy; This doesn’t actually exist.

I got to New York City at 7 am. The store opens at 8 am. My friend and I waited for an entire hour in line, only to find out at precisely 8 that they had sold out around 4 am. Why this information wasn’t posted on Twitter or Facebook or even mentioned to people lining up is beyond me.

What else really stings is that Nintendo reportedly only made around 300-500 copies of the collector’s edition. I suppose if I really want it, I could shell out the $1,400 that the item typically runs on eBay, but now we’re talking stupidity.

Factor in another Wii U title, Smash Bros, and you’ll be surprised to know that the Gamecube controller adapter (which only works with Smash, mind you) is virtually impossible to find. You can get plenty of the newer Gamecube controllers, but good luck using them with anything Smash Bros 4 related.

This brings me to the current Majora’s Mask situation. With the re-release of the game on 3DS, Nintendo issued a collector’s edition (thankfully away from their one US based store) and a limited “New” 3DS. Do you think anyone who has a day job was able to get these?

I somehow got my hands on the console. In a fervor with me in the bathroom, I ended up rushing through my “business” and jumping on my computer in seconds. While I think it was insane what I did, the fact that Nintendo is playing these kinds of games with retailers is just beyond unreasonable.

This is the only Triforce I need!

Nintendo, listen to me: You have products that people want. Fans of your games and creations are willing to pay good money to get “special” editions and collectibles. Instead of allowing scalpers to make a killing, why not release a higher quantity that matches demand?

Better yet, why not announce what your future plans are? Instead of saying things are going well on the sales front, how about you give your consumers a concrete idea for finding these supposed rare items. Don’t give us an excuse based on trade limitations.

While I can’t get behind Nintendo’s artificial scarcity, I will at least say that each item is pretty special. Maybe it is because of how exceptionally rare these items are, but I cherish my “New” 3DS and am proud to say that I was able to get that stupid blue shell from Mario Kart 8. I just wish a few more people had the chance to do so.

You’ve got nothing on a double Link assault!