DEMOlition – Katamari Forever

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Katamari Forever is a game that a lot of fans have been eagerly waiting for. While already out in Japan, Forever promises to deliver all kinds of nonsensical awesome mixed with the requisite Katamari flair.

Sony has kindly released a playable demo on PSN today and though I have already beaten most of the Japanese import (That’s right, I’m awesome……), I decided to give this demo a try to see what Sony has in store.

The demo has a generic title screen that is essentially the logo and “Press Start,” (along with some strange Notice about taking breaks and not using projection televisions). Once you skip that, you are taken to the main map that looks sort of like a pop-up book. It’s pretty neat, but it definitely gets annoying to navigate. You only have one option (other than Vibration settings) to play with, so once you click there, the mission select screen appears.

Thankfully Sony decided to include levels exclusive to Forever in the demo, so everything you play is brand new content (if you didn’t know, Katamari Forever works like a “Best Of” collection with levels from the first two games mixed with new things). The main level is a generic roll everything until you reach the goal and it definitely isn’t challenging. The goal they set for you is something that the first game had you doing in the 2nd level, meaning a Veteran of the series should have no problem.

The second level is where some of the unique charm of the series comes in (and is sort of inspired by We Love Katamari). You are tasked with rolling your Katamari into some water and then rolling across a desert to water up the place. While it’s not the most difficult thing you will ever do, it’s definitely a fun diversion from just rolling over stuff like a monster.

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The grass is always greener and Katamari proves that.

This desert level, in particular, brings out the best of the 1080p graphics. There is definitely some slow down (which doesn’t hurt as much as you would think), but the textures have a nice filter over them that makes everything seem like watercolor. Now, the final version features 4 different graphical filters, but the demo only lets you tinker with one.

The game’s controls have been literally unchanged from the previous Katamari titles, except that now you can jump. You jump by either using SIXAXIS or just pressing R2 (which definitely makes more sense). It can let you get to higher places in levels so that you can roll more and it even lets you clear some obstacles in your path (allowing you to soar over a pesky zebra or human).

The musical selection for the demo is a little lacking, but you can rest assured that the final title provides enough tracks to keep you satisfied. The demo has remixes for “Katamari on the Rocks” and the main theme, but neither one is really that outstanding. It kind of hinders the experience of Katamari when the songs are a little subpar.

In the end, though, Katamari Forever is definitely a fun little title. I may not be able to call it a classic like the first two, but the demo does give you something to bite into until the game comes out.

If you’re wondering what else the final game has, I will enlighten you a bit. There are about 24 levels of rolling madness that is composed primarily of We Love Katamari. Along with that you get a neat co-op mode that only has 6 levels, though it kind of wears thin after a bit.

The other graphical filters are things like a Wood finish and a Comic Book style and they definitely are a sight to behold in HD. The musical selection takes most of the tracks from We Love Katamari and gives those 2 or 3 remixes each (making for a colossal amount of music).

You also have the different cousins to change between, though there are really not any more than in We Love Katamari (the demo also lets you change, but you get about 7 of them). Along with the cousins, the presents return and let you change your character on 3 different levels (Head, Body and Feet).

So even though the demo is extremely short and lacking in much of a first impression, the final game will provide for fans clamoring for more. Give the demo a shot just to see how Katamari HD looks and maybe to get yourself acquainted if you’ve never tried a Katamari game before.

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DEMOlition – F.E.A.R. 2: Reborn

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Today’s game is F.E.A.R. 2: Reborn. To give some background, Monolith released F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin last year to lukewarm critical response and not much fan reaction (at least from what I heard of the game). F.E.A.R. 2 was a follow-up to their critically acclaimed F.E.A.R. from 2005 (which also happens to be one of my favorite PC shooters).

My personal opinion on F.E.A.R. 2 (God I hate acronyms) was simple: Hate. I found the game too dumbed down and easy for my tastes. The level design was too bright to illicit any kind of frightening reaction other than a gut response to something randomly popping in your face. The A.I. was so stupid (compared to the first game which has some of the best A.I. around), the guns lost their visceral edge (they no longer produced all the intense smoke effects from the first game) and the level design was just the generic scare tactic style that Monolith overused in the first game (where random things pop out at you).

Well, wouldn’t you be surprised to hear that I actually enjoyed this demo of the new DLC expansion? Before I start delving into the good stuff (gameplay), let me set up how the demo starts. The game begins with an extremely grainy and otherwise unimpressive intro that looks almost exactly like the intro to the first game (making me think this was a remake).

This demo shows the main villain of the first game (he may also be in the second, I never cared to beat it) spouting out some nonsense about how you can free him. After about a minute (and a short little clip of your character doing some cool things), your character stands up from some explosion (possibly the end of F.E.A.R. 2).

This is where I immediately began to feel the presence of F.E.A.R (no pun intended). The first game had such a dark and atmospheric setting about the game that you always wondered what would happen around each corner. This DLC pack seems to fall back on that design and makes your awareness limited to what you can see with your flashlight (which, thankfully, doesn’t die on you).

The surroundings are laid out in a manner similar to the first game, which means they are built like an office building. It was definitely good to feel like I was playing a direct continuation of the first game instead of a sequel that forgot where its roots were.

Soon after moving a bit, you fall down through the ceiling and are confronted with your first enemy. Being without weapon, you have to melee him and take his crappy pistol. I was a little confused as far as button placement went, but melee ended up being mapped to B (just like Halo), so it wasn’t hard to set myself to one control scheme.

The only problem with melee being B is that the rest of the controls don’t follow Halo standards (or even Call of Duty or Battlefield, for that matter). When you pick up the pistol, you know RT is fire, but switching weapons is relegated to LB, with RB being grenade and LT being iron-sights (zoom). This is one of the places where I felt a bit disappointed in the demo. There is no option to bind your own controls, so you are left with a scheme that seems to be esoteric to Monolith games.

Even so, when you fire off a round with the pistol, the guns instantly feel familiar. F.E.A.R. 2 forgot about making their gunplay as impressive looking as it was handling, but Reborn doesn’t make the same mistake. Bullets impact with a splash of blood and the walls will crater when shot. Everything is definitely great looking in terms of technical value, so your guns feel heavy and realistic (just like in the first game). Sometimes your shots don’t seem to connect, though, so that does feel strange when you are missing your mark, but have a dead reticule on the enemy.

When you kill your next soldier and round another corner, the game pops-up to remind you of F.E.A.R.’s patented slow-mo ability. This ability never seemed to bother me in the original (often getting me out of ridiculous jams), but it definitely makes the combat extremely easy in this demo. Even on hardest, popping on slow-mo for 10 seconds can allow you to clear a room of 5 people.

The recharge timer for this slow-mo has been changed from the first game (probably in the second, I just can’t remember). It seems to charge a bit faster, meaning you will always have it in a rough spot. It’s just too bad the A.I. still can’t match the quality of the first. It outpaces vanilla F.E.A.R. 2, though. While I was sitting in a corner and picking off guys, I started dying randomly and turned to see a soldier behind me. Me somehow worked his way out of the scuffle and began to take me out, which is definitely neat.

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A.I. Tactics like cover were missing in F.E.A.R. 2, but are back in Reborn.

As for how to deal with sneaky soldiers, this demo gives you a small bit of the arsenal available in the final DLC. Along to the pistol, you are given a rather simple SMG, 3 grenade types (being proximity, frag and flame), a shotgun and a nail-gun. Yes, a freakin nail-gun. Plugging enemies in the head is so intensely satisfying that I just relied solely on this for the rest of the demo (though it does come a bit towards the end).

As for the rest of the A.I., they just kind of sit around and take your bullets. It’s not like killing them isn’t fun (especially with particle effects flying about), but challenge is not something F.E.A.R. 2: Reborn offers. What it lacks in difficulty, it makes up for with its set pieces.

After killing a few generic grunts, you jump down another level to a sniper waiting (which is easily killed by slow-mo shots) and some tank like people. These tanks don’t pose much of a threat, but waiting for them to turn corners is pointless. You are in a small area that is made of wooden walls, so the tanks just kind of bust through them. It definitely leads to some, “OH S@&^!” moments and the game feels more like it is trying to set up impressive battles like the first game.

The demo closes with you sliding down an office building, but making careful jumps from desk to ceiling pillar so as not to die. It’s very hectic and the camera is never straight, so you are always being cautious with your jumps. This also hints back to the first game, where most of the puzzles were based on moving your character instead of trying to flip a switch and press-on.

In the end, I felt rather amused and happy with the demo. F.E.A.R. 2 put a bad taste in my mouth, but this DLC seems to be correcting a lot of the issues the original title had. While the A.I. might not be up to F.E.A.R.’s level and the guns still aren’t perfect, at least Monolith realized that their level design was lacking. Simply darkening the game and going back to basics has done a lot in making me get sucked into the game world, so I commend them for that.

If you played F.E.A.R. 2 and enjoyed it, you will definitely be pleased with Reborn. The DLC should be releasing on September 3rd (Source), though no price is announced (I say expect 800 MS Points/$10 PSN). While the pack only comes with 4 levels, having them as good as the demo was would make for an amazing little download. I may actually want to finish F.E.A.R. 2 and get this pack, myself, that how much I enjoyed it.

My Summer – Day 6: Katamari Damacy & We Love Katamari

After not having written a blog in 3 months, I’ve come back with A VENGEANCE! For the next week, I will be doing daily write-ups on all of the games I played this summer. I will double up on a few days for games I played that had sequels (which I also played).


Without any further delay, I present to you, both Katamari PS2 games!

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Katamari Damacy was a sleeper-hit of the PS2 catalog. The game literally came out of nowhere and ended up being a critic and fan favorite from 2004. The game was so unexpected to sell that retailers under stocked the game and ended up selling out fast.

Namco eventually released sequels to Katamari Damacy and the series launched into a franchise. Katamari has gone on to become one of the most beloved series on any platform in recent memory.

While this is all well and good, I never knew what the game was about until I played it this year. I remember loving the idea back in 2004 and telling my friends to jump on board, but I was never able to find a copy to play.

Well, even with all the hype behind the title, I was no disappointed with the end result. Katamari Damacy is one of the simplest ideas in the world, yet its execution is second to none. Colorful graphics, exuberant music and charming characters all collide to make a joyous experience, even if the gameplay isn’t totally refined.

The first game has no real plot structure, but it does have a central idea. The King of All Cosmos accidentally caused some problem that sucked all of the stars out of the sky. Feeling like an idiot but not willing to work to correct the problem, The King assigns his son to clean up the night sky.

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Son, Daddy made a boo-boo…

You play as “The Prince” and you roll around with your “Katamari,” picking up anything in your path and using it to create stars. That is the entire plot and game in one sentence (impressive, I know). While you would figure this idea would get boring or repetitive, you have yet to experience the pure joy that rolling produces.

The game plays in that the King gives you a goal of rolling up a Katamari of a certain size. Size is how the game scores you and producing something that is bare minimum usually results in the King saying your skills are lacking.

Regardless of what the King says to you, the game makes its initial goals extremely easy to grasp. Simple things like, “Roll me a 20 cm Katamari in 5 minutes,” are what are offered at the start, but soon the game will have you doubling, tripling and even quadrupling your Katamari in the same amount of time.

Finding things to roll up into your Katamari is never an impossible task. Your Katamari can pick up anything and everything, though things need to be proportionate to your Katamari’s size. Rolling things like buttons, currency, pencils, paper, etc, I literally do mean anything can be rolled.

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Yes, those are buildings.

The progression from simple goals to quite extreme ones is relatively fast, but considering the game is such an easy thing to master, you never really hit a point where your objective becomes impassable. The game has such an amazing incorporation of relaxing music that even if you do hit a goal that requires multiple visits, you never become aggravated.

The game also throws a few goals at you that require certain items to be rolled. When I say certain items, I mean things like all crabs or only one bear. These goals help differentiate the objectives from mission to mission and break the games monotony when too many simple rolling levels go by.

The game uses a control setup that requires both analog sticks to be used on the PS2 controller. While a setup like this is not entirely revolutionary, the way in which the game makes use of just the 2 sticks is quite impressive. You move the two sticks forward to make your Katamari roll forward; backwards goes back, left goes left and etc. The Katamari is almost like a boat.

What else the sticks do is help with faster movement and turning. Clicking both sticks will make the Prince jump to the other side of the Katamari, immediately turning you around. Alternating the sticks in an up and down motion will send the Katamari flying forward in a quick dash.

The King of All Cosmos is easily one of the best reasons to play this game. His character is written as a narcissistic, ego-crazy kind of guy, but his charm is so friendly that you can’t help but love him. The Prince is also such a cute creation that just looking at his face makes you fall in love (wait…….).

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NA, NA, NANA NA NA, NA NA, NA….

And that is all that the game really is. There is nothing more I can say about Katamari Damacy other than it’s a classic and a quirky, unexpected delight. While Katamari Damacy may be short (took me about 5 hours to complete), what else I can talk about is the sequel, We Love Katamari.

We Love Katamari may almost seem like Namco was trying to cash in on the craze that the first game caused and that is partially true. What is unexpected from this sequel, though, is that it is better than the first game in terms of value.

That is right; We Love Katamari is about double the length of the first game and includes some of the zaniest objectives I could ever possibly imagine for a game about rolling a ball. Namco ups the ante by making the Katamari’s bigger, the characters zanier and the music more off the wall.

The story deals with the King of All Cosmos not knowing what to do with all the success he had with his first Katamari ordeal (yes, breaking the 4th wall). Being the glory hog that he is, the King listens to the fans and gives them what they want; More Katamari Damacy!

Gameplay and control wise, everything is exactly the same. The camera system gets a slight overhaul to make it more focused, but that only helps to strengthen the rolling aspect of the game. The objectives range from the typical “Rolling Anything” to the unexpected, “Roll this Sumo Wrestler Around to make him fat.”

The levels have brighter graphics and catch your eye easier than in the first game. The game also introduces cousins for the Prince, allowing the player to change characters during the game. Along with that, you can now dress the Prince up, making him more adorable than ever.

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Roll, Ichigo, Roll!

The difficulty is also more in check, with the goals gradually building up to a massive finish instead of just dropping it on you in one extreme goal. Along with that, the music is an even bigger collection of outlandish and captivating tunes and allows you to change the song for the level, meaning if replays are needed you won’t get tired of the song played.

Katamari Damacy really is the classic that it has been hyped to be. I was surprised as hell to find that I loved the game more than anything I’ve played in recent years. I’m not sure if the graphics did it for me or the music, but everything in the finished package is worthy of praise.

If you haven’t managed to play this game, please do yourself a favor and give it a shot. The simple nature of the game means it is accessible to everyone and the gradual increase of difficulty means that even novices will be able to eventually complete the title. That alone should give you enough solace to know this title is worth it.

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We All Love it and you will too!

My Summer – Day 1: Prototype

After not having written a blog in 3 months, I’ve come back with A VENGEANCE! For the next week, I will be doing daily write-ups on all of the games I played this summer. I will double up on a few days for games I played that had sequels (which I also played).

While you may think these are reviews, I am trying to put my opinion on the matter while also pointing out flaws and general praises that I have for a game. I will not be dolling out scores, or even sectioning off my texts into topics.

Without any further delay, I present to you, Prototype.

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Ah Prototype, a game that received a lot of controversy for being similar to a certain PS3 title (and a coming overview from me in a few days). While not the best game in its genre (Open World Adventure), Prototype is certainly a thrilling experience from beginning to end.

The game starts off with a rather amazing looking cutscene that tries it’s best to rip-off every Quentin Tarantino movie ever made. You start the game off at the end of the story and your character, Alex Mercer, works his way backwards. Not only that, but you play a part that chronologically takes place almost at the end of your adventure.

This shows off some of the impressive abilities you (eventually) have at your disposal. Things like blades growing out of your arms, tentacles that destroy everything they touch; even massive Hulk like arms. This is all exhilarating and you really get a sense that you are a WMD. Not only that, but you are unleashed into Times Square with a pretty accurate representation.

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Just one of your many abilities at work!

After you complete this part, you are thrust into the main plotline. While you don’t know anything about your character, the story does little to shed light on the cause at the moment. All you kind of get is that Alex is wanted DOA, so you need to work fast to thwart your enemies.

Missions are what propel you through this game and they certainly are fun, at first. While everything is a bit generic, the game gives you a large quantity of experience points to upgrade your character. Doing 1 mission early in the game pretty much guarantees you 2-3 upgrades each time. You even get the ability to copy an individuals image so you can cloak in the crowd; Sweet.

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ROSA! GIVE ME YOUR PEE!

When you slowly begin to build back your abilities, you learn some neat tricks. Alex has super speed, a devastating last stand attack and even the ability to glide in the air. This harkens back to Spider-man 2 with its amazing webslinging. Running through the city is definitely fun for a bit, but just trying to build your speed and jumping distance make traveling fast a simple act.

After about 2 hours in, though, Prototype takes a massive turn for the worst. The graphics were never astounding (even with the first cutscene being ridiculously good), but they really show a lot of pop-in and repetition in building design. You run down the streets of NYC and feel like you entered a perpetual warp zone. Not only that, you should have a few upgrades for your speed, which makes the pop-in even worse then you jump for a building that doesn’t exist yet.

Not only that, Alex is definitely an extremely generic dude. While the story started off vague, it never clears anything up. There is an answer to why Alex is such a beast, but it feels like a cop-out and, to a lesser extent, a copy of Bourne Identity. Alex also just acts pissed off because he can. Are the police getting on your nerves? “I F*#@ING HATE THEM! HULK SMASH!”

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I smolder with generic rage!

The enemy A.I. is also some of the worst of any open-world game I’ve recently played. Instead of trying to balance the difficulty by, say, making the enemies use cover tactics or any type of actual warfare, Prototype just throws horde after horde of beasts in your direction. You eventually get to a point in the story where you fail until you upgrade your health or run around like a fool.

Not only is the generic enemy A.I. bad, but the bosses are even stupider. I know boss battles in the past have had patterns, but the Prototype bosses rarely move. They just sit there sprouting out insults and using the same attack over and over. Once you get past the horde of 16 million generic enemies bum rushing you, the boss gets a cheap shot and you have to repeat the process. This gets extremely trying on your nerves and I almost gave up at a few points. I’m sure Easy difficulty could have alleviated this problem, but who wants to play a game on Easy?

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These guys will definitely piss you off.

These problems wouldn’t be so bad to me if the game just varied its design more. In addition to the main quests, you have short activities that are supposed to use your powers for objectives. The only thing that stands out is a Gliding mini-game where you have Alex time his jumps to reach a small circle about 5 city blocks away (and one in the middle of a lake). It really sticks out in the otherwise generic objectives that are thrown at you in every other mission.

The other minigames consist of Speed Trials and Killing (even if you kill with the cause being A) Time Limit, B) Amount or C) With an Ability). These are overly difficult at times and at others are too simple. There is no real balance between what you should be able to do with patience and what you just cannot do at all.

I have to say, though, that I did enjoy the initial game I played. If Activision put a lot more time polishing the things like Story, Graphics and Variety, I may have been inclined to sit here and tell you that Prototype is an amazing game. I do recommend it to people who like their combat bloody and hardcore, but if you have been burnt out on Open-World games recently, you are better off skipping this and picking up a certain clone (inFamous).

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MOAR CLAW!

Prince of Persia (2008) Review

Prince of Persia (2008) is a very interesting title. On one end you get an alienation of the fanbase that made Sands of Time such a hit (though not a massive one considering sales). On the other end you have an extremely approachable and often times serene game that should make any intrigued gamer pleased.

I recently have tread through both the main game and the epilogue DLC, so I would like to review the main game to give my fellow g1s some thoughts. I in no way expect people to take my word as final and I will try my best to point out any bias that I may have with game design.

To get bias section out of the way, I enjoy dying…Sounds weird, doesn’t it? Still, I enjoy the fact that games challenge you by making you die. Another bias I have is against overly complicated combat systems for platformers.

On to the review. I am going to break down the main game into 4 sections: Gameplay, Graphics (more like artistry instead of actual game engine), Storyline and Replay. Obviously the main game has DLC, but I am not factoring that into the replay factor.

Prince of Persia (2008):

Storyline – The plot within Prince of Persia is rather weak. While The Sands of Time did not have the strongest storyline ever conceived, you grew to fall in love with the characters. This enhanced their struggle and had you crying (was I the only one?) when the entire thing was reversed and the Prince got ripped off.

2008 doesn’t really capture that same magic. The plot starts off decent, but just falls flat towards the end (I will not use spoilers). The first scene has our hero (called the Prince but really just a vagabond) walking through a sandstorm looking for his donkey (named after the heroine of Sand of Time, Farah…too bad I enjoyed her enough to think this joke is funny). After a certain amount of time (maybe hours?), he stumbles upon a fleeing Princess.

We soon learn that this Princess is named Elika. She is fleeing from her father who is trying to force her to stay in his Kingdom for one reason or another. With the aide of the Prince, Elika is able to escape the clutches of her father for awhile. While fleeing, the Prince learns that Elika has magical properties.

Once Elika and the Prince get time to talk, we learn that the Kingdom is under the threat of a powerful god named Ahriman. Ahriman wants to conquer the Kingdom and destroy the world (maybe). Elika clings on the the idea that her father is only trying to get her to help save the place, but that is obviously garbage.

The rest of the game revolves around the interactions between the Prince and Elika while they are going around and removing spots of “corruption” that Ahriman has plagued the land with.

Now, this all seems really generic (how many games have save the world plots anyway?), but what really drives the fact home is A) The plot never gets into any deep talk about why Elika’s father is helping Ahriman and B) the lackluster conclusion. I will not mention anything, but there is a ridiculously stupid (and possibly game breaking) closer in the end of this game.

The other aspect of the plot that gets glossed over is any real reason why this is happening. Ahriman must be pissed, because destroying a people makes no sense without context. It’s really fantastic that I can learn about his minions that conquer certain areas, but why am I not given the information about why he himself wants to kill everyone?

Gameplay – At least the game is good, right? Well…yes and no. What do I mean? Well, let’s just dive right in.

The game is built around an open-world style map with many different areas to explore (I believe 24 in total). What you are tasked with doing is choosing an area to start with and platform running your way through it. You hop, flip, jump, skip and even fly your way to the end goal of a boss fight and healing the area.

Once reaching this boss, you go into combat mode and are given a pretty beefy combat system. Your enemies range in style and design and give a reasonable amount of challenge in their final offerings. You are able to link attack combos together by mixing up your button combinations. Hitting XXXX (or Sqaure, Square, Square, Square for PS3 users) is the most basic of attacks, but you can mix things up with a throw (mapped to B or Circle), an acrobatic move (A or X) or your partner Elika (Y or Triangle) can be called in to do some magic damage.

While this seems deep, the problem is the A.I. design. Your enemies have one main attack pattern and one QTE (quick time event) sequence that is used to defeat them. Once you get them towards the edge of your combat arena, the QTE will trigger and you will knock them down for an instant kill.

If you fail the event, you often just get knocked aside. Some bosses don’t have any instant kill QTEs, so you are stuck trying to figure out which combo deals the most damage to them. The main problem with such a free-flowing combat system is that your patterns make no sense. I’ve managed to input an attack that was XYYBAXYB and it does the same amount of damage as XYYBAB. Notice the lack of 2 attacks on the end there?

Another thing is the boss patterns and A.I. design. All the bosses do is stick to their one routine and never change up. There happens to be 4 different bosses, but the smallest change doesn’t bring about anymore enjoyment. You also run into smaller drones during your journeys between areas, but they are essentially smaller versions of their boss brethren.

You also have no way of incorporating the platform aspects of the game into the combat. Once you reach a boss, you are locked into a 1 on 1 (or 2 on 1 considering Elika). This also brings to mind the fact that you never get to face more than 1 opponent at a time. Why not, is that too challenging?

The final nail in the coffin for the combat is the repetitive nature. The 24 areas of exploration are divided into 4 sections. Each section has one boss who rules over the areas. Once you run through the areas, you fight the boss. There are 6 sections to each area, meaning you fight all 4 of the bosses 6 times. I’ve heard of padding out the length of a game, but this is just stupid.

The platforming aspects of the game are real winners, though. The downside to this part is that you cannot die…ever. You miss a jump and Elika brings you back with her magic (her magic also applies in combat with dying). Still, the controls are so smooth that simply jumping at a wall starts a wallrun.

Once running, you simply wait for your platform of interest to come into view and jump for it (with A or X). You also get to climb and jump from poles, swings off of flagpoles and even run on ceilings to reach door knockers (I think). The best part of this platforming is your claw.

The Prince has some gauntlet on his left hand that acts like a claw. You are able to grind down almost anything with this claw. If you mistime a jump, you may have redemption if you are able to slide down the wall and jump back to the beginning (though this usually doesn’t work). Your claw also lets the developers have some fun with level design.

After platforming and fighting, you get to heal the land you just crossed. Healing the land is like taking that small step towards re-imprisoning the evil god chasing you. All the healing does is make the “corruption” go away and bring about a beautiful panoramic vista to look at. The game also tasks you (after the healing) with collecting power-ups for Elika known as light seeds.

The game requires about half of the total amount of light seeds in the game to be collected. There are 1001 in total. All that is really needed to get to these seeds is repeating the platforming you did in the first place.

The collecting of these seeds is possibly the worst aspect of the game. Why should one have to repeat something they did? While there is probably no other way to creatively give gamers a reason to revist their creations, couldn’t the developers have not included the seeds? Was simply accomplishing a level too simple of a task?

Graphics – The art style for this game is rather bland. I can’t say that I enjoyed anything in particular about the way this game looked, artistically speaking. I was impressed with how well the water-color style was pulled off, but the Prince and Elika have a far too Western and modern look to be believable as Persians.

The Prince is dressed believably as a Vagabond, but at the same time he has some semblance of modern living. No person back in Persian times would have the technology to build a metal claw (just not happening). His build is also very bulky and muscular, which is something that the modern man is made out to be (though not Chris Redfield muscular).

Elika, at first, looks very appropriate, but you soon learn about her background and wonder what the hell? Elika is a Princess, so why does she look like my sister? Her clothes are extremely generic and her torn shirt seems, to me, to be a way to cash in on hormone enraged males. Her tattered hair never changes when running around, so her looks come off as synthetic. She gets points for staying fully clothed throughout the game, though.

The rest of the cast is awkward, to say the least. The King (Elika’s father) is just like any other King you’ve probably ever seen. Purple Robe, beard, long set of hair. He doesn’t really look Persian, though, so that fails with the name of the game.

The enemies have very bright and eye-catching colors, but their styles are just weird. The “corruption” that Ahriman spreads is just black blobs mixed with human bodies, so the main bosses of the game just come off as lazy. Anyone can create a concubine that is all slime.

Replay – There isn’t much to say about replay value for this game. Beating the platforming sections is fun, but the only reason that you’d do them again (other than collecting the necessary light seeds) is to collect the remaining light seeds after your grand total. Collecting those extra seeds gives you achievements/trophies for your gamer profile, but if you don’t care about that, then there is no point.

The combat is extremely weak, so replaying that (which you have to do), just sucks. I cannot really think of any reason to return to this game other than plot (which is of lackluster quality).

For a final score, I am going to give this a 7.5/10. If you want that broken down more, here would be my scores:
Gameplay – 7
Graphics – 8
Storyline – 6
Replay – 5

The combat and lack of difficulty with the platforming really destroy a lot of fun you may have with the title. Nothing else falls into place either, so you are left with a game experience that just does not work. The game is immediately approachable to casual gamers, though, so that is a win in one respect. The graphics are nice, too, despite lacking in style.

This game has me torn, but not really as much as the failure of DLC that is provided for it. I will review that tomorrow (and I promise that it will not be an epic dissection like I did with this game). If you managed to get this far with the text, I applaud you.

Too Human

An old Blog I wrote on Gamespot that bashed Too Human. I’m not sure if I should be reposting this (it wasn’t a very timely editorial), but here goes.

My first actual article on here that won’t relate to my game playing. Anyway, this is all about Too Human and my opinions on it. I will also talk a bit about game reviewing and some personal things that have come to my attention. Do not take this as a review, because I’m not doing that here. You may enjoy Too Human, but I just want to point out things I see wrong with it.

First in order is some Too Human bashing. If anything, I think the current state of reviews are too forgiving. This game has been in development for over 10 years. The fact that this game isn’t a masterpiece means it shouldn’t be worth your time for that reason alone. You also get a ridiculous control scheme that went out when camera control became essential to game playing. The only time I’ve ever seen dual analog work in a game is with something like Geometry Wars or Ape Escape (Not to mention Ape Escape 3 and so forth suffered because of their lack of camera control).The whole dynamic cutscene thing is jarring, too. I know that it’s supposed to be a way of making you feel like you are controlling a movie, but why is it never explained. Playing the demo, I wasn’t even sure if I was supposed to move or just wait, but then my friend enlightened me to it’s existence.

The loot drops seem like a cool idea, until you realize that it happens on every single enemy. There will eventually have to be a point where you have armour so good that a small increase would make no difference. The game won’t stop giving you armour, though, so you’re going to have to deal with a loaded inventory. I’ve also seen videos where, further into the game, you are still battling the same creatures. That is just superb, what better way to bring down an RPG then to have you face the same creatures over and over. Wait, I know a better way, scale the battles. That’s right, Too Human has scaled battles. Are you too low of a level? Don’t worry, Too Human will make you win! While your level may be always on top, your health might not. None of the classes except Bio-Engineer can heal, so you eventually will have to die. This wouldn’t be that big of an issue in the game (since it automatically brings you back) if you could skip the death cutscene. It’s cool the first time you see it, but once you die around 500 times, I would assume the charm wears off.

I cannot say much for the story (since I have not played the game enough to care), but mixing Norse Gods with Cyberpunk technology is idiotic at best. Just think of a world where enemies can carry blasters but you are left with a sword. It’s like turn of the century crap that killed the Samurai. There is no plausible way to explain why someone would prefer to use a sword over a gun, either. It doesn’t help that the guns are so generic and have some auto-lock on ability. You just hold down the button and fire away. It takes any of the thinking out of battle. An RPG without a good battle system is already DOA. It could be salvaged if the melee weren’t mapped to the control stick! Why, oh why is the melee on the control stick?! You tilt it forward but you end up swinging to the left. Then, because of the auto-lock on from the guns, your character gets stuck on an enemy and just flies towards them when you swing the stick. It ends up playing like an idiotic version of Diablo.

Enough about Too Human, though. I can go on for awhile about how I hate it, but I want to address one final thing. I’ve been hanging around a kid who enjoys RPGs a little too much. He sits there and talks about how games like Legend of Dragoon were under rated. He also tried to explain to me how the combo system in that differentiated it from Final Fantasy. I can understand he enjoys RPGs, but to say the one change in a game like Legend of Dragoon makes it different is just stupid. Everything about that game is Final Fantasy, except not done to the same polish or even depth of the said titles. Just because he plays RPGs, though, he assumes his opinion is fact. This whole rant is about how gamers need to step down every now and then. I guess I am sitting here trying to explain how I am right, but my point is that, just because you play a certain genre doesn’t mean everything in that genre is amazing. You need to look at things critically for once and know when a game is actually bad. I don’t play every shooter and call it a masterpiece, such like people shouldn’t assume every RPG is a masterpiece.

Another thing, don’t take all critics seriously. While I haven’t seen a game in a long time get panned by critics without deserving it, not every single low rated game is bad. Also, not every high rated game is superb. We all need to be our own critics, but when game designers make ridiculous choices (such with Too Human), you have to realize that critics are just there pointing out blemishes.