My Summer – Day 6: Katamari Damacy & We Love Katamari

After not having written a blog in 3 months, I’ve come back with A VENGEANCE! For the next week, I will be doing daily write-ups on all of the games I played this summer. I will double up on a few days for games I played that had sequels (which I also played).


Without any further delay, I present to you, both Katamari PS2 games!

Logo 1

Katamari Damacy was a sleeper-hit of the PS2 catalog. The game literally came out of nowhere and ended up being a critic and fan favorite from 2004. The game was so unexpected to sell that retailers under stocked the game and ended up selling out fast.

Namco eventually released sequels to Katamari Damacy and the series launched into a franchise. Katamari has gone on to become one of the most beloved series on any platform in recent memory.

While this is all well and good, I never knew what the game was about until I played it this year. I remember loving the idea back in 2004 and telling my friends to jump on board, but I was never able to find a copy to play.

Well, even with all the hype behind the title, I was no disappointed with the end result. Katamari Damacy is one of the simplest ideas in the world, yet its execution is second to none. Colorful graphics, exuberant music and charming characters all collide to make a joyous experience, even if the gameplay isn’t totally refined.

The first game has no real plot structure, but it does have a central idea. The King of All Cosmos accidentally caused some problem that sucked all of the stars out of the sky. Feeling like an idiot but not willing to work to correct the problem, The King assigns his son to clean up the night sky.

King of All Cosmos
Son, Daddy made a boo-boo…

You play as “The Prince” and you roll around with your “Katamari,” picking up anything in your path and using it to create stars. That is the entire plot and game in one sentence (impressive, I know). While you would figure this idea would get boring or repetitive, you have yet to experience the pure joy that rolling produces.

The game plays in that the King gives you a goal of rolling up a Katamari of a certain size. Size is how the game scores you and producing something that is bare minimum usually results in the King saying your skills are lacking.

Regardless of what the King says to you, the game makes its initial goals extremely easy to grasp. Simple things like, “Roll me a 20 cm Katamari in 5 minutes,” are what are offered at the start, but soon the game will have you doubling, tripling and even quadrupling your Katamari in the same amount of time.

Finding things to roll up into your Katamari is never an impossible task. Your Katamari can pick up anything and everything, though things need to be proportionate to your Katamari’s size. Rolling things like buttons, currency, pencils, paper, etc, I literally do mean anything can be rolled.

Rolling
Yes, those are buildings.

The progression from simple goals to quite extreme ones is relatively fast, but considering the game is such an easy thing to master, you never really hit a point where your objective becomes impassable. The game has such an amazing incorporation of relaxing music that even if you do hit a goal that requires multiple visits, you never become aggravated.

The game also throws a few goals at you that require certain items to be rolled. When I say certain items, I mean things like all crabs or only one bear. These goals help differentiate the objectives from mission to mission and break the games monotony when too many simple rolling levels go by.

The game uses a control setup that requires both analog sticks to be used on the PS2 controller. While a setup like this is not entirely revolutionary, the way in which the game makes use of just the 2 sticks is quite impressive. You move the two sticks forward to make your Katamari roll forward; backwards goes back, left goes left and etc. The Katamari is almost like a boat.

What else the sticks do is help with faster movement and turning. Clicking both sticks will make the Prince jump to the other side of the Katamari, immediately turning you around. Alternating the sticks in an up and down motion will send the Katamari flying forward in a quick dash.

The King of All Cosmos is easily one of the best reasons to play this game. His character is written as a narcissistic, ego-crazy kind of guy, but his charm is so friendly that you can’t help but love him. The Prince is also such a cute creation that just looking at his face makes you fall in love (wait…….).

Bowling
NA, NA, NANA NA NA, NA NA, NA….

And that is all that the game really is. There is nothing more I can say about Katamari Damacy other than it’s a classic and a quirky, unexpected delight. While Katamari Damacy may be short (took me about 5 hours to complete), what else I can talk about is the sequel, We Love Katamari.

We Love Katamari may almost seem like Namco was trying to cash in on the craze that the first game caused and that is partially true. What is unexpected from this sequel, though, is that it is better than the first game in terms of value.

That is right; We Love Katamari is about double the length of the first game and includes some of the zaniest objectives I could ever possibly imagine for a game about rolling a ball. Namco ups the ante by making the Katamari’s bigger, the characters zanier and the music more off the wall.

The story deals with the King of All Cosmos not knowing what to do with all the success he had with his first Katamari ordeal (yes, breaking the 4th wall). Being the glory hog that he is, the King listens to the fans and gives them what they want; More Katamari Damacy!

Gameplay and control wise, everything is exactly the same. The camera system gets a slight overhaul to make it more focused, but that only helps to strengthen the rolling aspect of the game. The objectives range from the typical “Rolling Anything” to the unexpected, “Roll this Sumo Wrestler Around to make him fat.”

The levels have brighter graphics and catch your eye easier than in the first game. The game also introduces cousins for the Prince, allowing the player to change characters during the game. Along with that, you can now dress the Prince up, making him more adorable than ever.

Rolling 2
Roll, Ichigo, Roll!

The difficulty is also more in check, with the goals gradually building up to a massive finish instead of just dropping it on you in one extreme goal. Along with that, the music is an even bigger collection of outlandish and captivating tunes and allows you to change the song for the level, meaning if replays are needed you won’t get tired of the song played.

Katamari Damacy really is the classic that it has been hyped to be. I was surprised as hell to find that I loved the game more than anything I’ve played in recent years. I’m not sure if the graphics did it for me or the music, but everything in the finished package is worthy of praise.

If you haven’t managed to play this game, please do yourself a favor and give it a shot. The simple nature of the game means it is accessible to everyone and the gradual increase of difficulty means that even novices will be able to eventually complete the title. That alone should give you enough solace to know this title is worth it.

Logo 2
We All Love it and you will too!

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